A Tiger Does Not Feel Guilt To Kill Another Animal Corona – The Predator and The Prey

You are searching about A Tiger Does Not Feel Guilt To Kill Another Animal, today we will share with you article about A Tiger Does Not Feel Guilt To Kill Another Animal was compiled and edited by our team from many sources on the internet. Hope this article on the topic A Tiger Does Not Feel Guilt To Kill Another Animal is useful to you.

Corona – The Predator and The Prey

It seems that the coronavirus called Covid-19 has scared the world. He has become the father of the 21st century. At first, it scared the medical profession because of how quickly it spread and killed people. They, in turn, scared governments around the world into taking drastic measures to move into varying degrees of lockdown. It has been nothing but a socio-economic disaster for most countries. And the way the media continues to report this virus infection is causing further unnecessary panic, chaos and confusion in the public.

In my previous article titled “Corona- The Making of the Bogeyman”, I pointed out how a frightened mind is incapable of rational thought. I also pointed out how a bureaucratic mind is also incapable of such thinking. So it is clear to me that a scared bureaucrat would be doubly incapable of making any rational decisions. This fact is evident from what we have seen in the bureaucratic actions taken by governments around the world.

What worries and disappoints me the most is the medical profession and the role it plays. It is supposed to take care of people’s physical and mental health, but it is helping the government to make people’s lives more miserable. They don’t seem to appreciate the fact that saving lives at all costs is not the only thing that matters. Socio-economic costs must be considered in our decision-making; otherwise, our actions become counterproductive and irresponsible. Millions of people have lost their jobs and millions of businesses have gone out of business. How can we ignore the mental and physical side effects on the population of bureaucratic government action that creates poverty? Poverty becomes fertile ground for an increase in crime, violence, drug abuse and suicides, etc. Please remember that the brunt of all these measures are borne by private individuals, not government employees who are largely financially unaffected.

In my mind, I consider the blockade to be an inhuman act. Locking people living in high-rises for six weeks is like sentencing them to solitary confinement in their cells. Also, how can we justify locking people on a cruise ship for days through no fault of their own, just because they have a case of the coronavirus on board? Blocking can only be justified if the measures we take kill or eliminate the virus; otherwise we are catching the tiger only by the tail.

If we examine all the measures we have taken so far, we will find that they are panic measures. They do not eliminate or kill the virus. Blocking only slows the spread of the virus. It is the nature of all viral infections to spread. So once we lift the lockdown, this virus will spread. The infection curve should increase. We have to appreciate the fact that this coronavirus is here to stay, and we will have to learn to live with it the same way we are doing with the flu virus.

So what does the future hold? Do we go into isolation every time the infection curve rises? Do we close schools and workplaces every time someone tests positive? Do we remain cowed and subject to bureaucratic scrutiny until we find a cure?

It is easy for countries with relatively small and sparse populations like Australia and New Zealand to claim success in managing this virus with lockdown measures. However, in densely populated countries like India and Europe, it is obviously not a practical proposition.

So there must be a better way to manage this problem. If I found myself in a distant city and a case of coronavirus presented itself for treatment, I ask myself, what would I do? Having no diagnostic facilities available, I would have treated that patient in the same way as I would have treated a case of influenza. Would this have resulted in a different outcome for my patient or me?

It can be seen that all this testing for the virus in the population may be academically desirable; however, the way the media reports it should be a matter of concern for all of us trying to improve our mental health. It is scaring the public and causing unnecessary anxiety and alarm.

Perhaps we can learn from our animal friends how they manage to live in peace with all the predators around them since the beginning of time. If we look at the buffaloes and the lions, we see that the lions scared the buffaloes by chasing them. As soon as the lions catch the weakest, the buffaloes stop running. They begin to graze in a relaxed manner, knowing that the lions will not attack them until they are hungry again. They do not remain afraid.

I consider all viruses lurking in our atmosphere as predators waiting to pounce on us like hungry lions and tigers. Usually, a healthy individual will resist a viral infection depending on the strength of one’s immune system. But once some mental or physical factor weakens our immune system, we can fall prey to any such virus. Thus, the onus is on each individual in society to maintain a level of fitness that will protect the person.

However, we have good ones in society who want to save us from ourselves, like the medical profession and the government. They want to show us and prove to us that they can save lives, regardless of the cost. Of course there is a political motive in all this. No one wants to die, so no one will oppose someone who will protect us. How can anyone oppose such a noble cause when someone is saving lives? Politicians and the medical profession become our heroes and they get our votes.

Yes, it is relatively easy to save lives and become heroes if we think bureaucratically and ignore the negative consequences of our action. But there are higher responsibilities attached to the jobs of our medical and political leaders than simply trying to save human lives, if they cared to think about Suppose you are at the helm of an overcrowded lifeboat. You know that if you take one more person on board, the ship will capsize and sink. There are people in the sea still begging to be saved. Do you have a choice? Please think. Will you feel like a hero? Do you still believe in saving life at any cost?

The way I see it, we have to come to terms with the coronavirus and treat it the same way we treat the flu virus. The world cannot afford to remain scared. In my mind, there is no such thing as the future. The future is what we create through the actions we take in the present. If we take no action now, our present becomes our future.

Will we reassess our approach to the coronavirus? Will we remain frightened? Will our medical and political leaders wake up to their responsibilities? Are we going to continue with this bureaucratic madness?

Video about A Tiger Does Not Feel Guilt To Kill Another Animal

You can see more content about A Tiger Does Not Feel Guilt To Kill Another Animal on our youtube channel: Click Here

Question about A Tiger Does Not Feel Guilt To Kill Another Animal

If you have any questions about A Tiger Does Not Feel Guilt To Kill Another Animal, please let us know, all your questions or suggestions will help us improve in the following articles!

The article A Tiger Does Not Feel Guilt To Kill Another Animal was compiled by me and my team from many sources. If you find the article A Tiger Does Not Feel Guilt To Kill Another Animal helpful to you, please support the team Like or Share!

Rate Articles A Tiger Does Not Feel Guilt To Kill Another Animal

Rate: 4-5 stars
Ratings: 8435
Views: 49796920

Search keywords A Tiger Does Not Feel Guilt To Kill Another Animal

A Tiger Does Not Feel Guilt To Kill Another Animal
way A Tiger Does Not Feel Guilt To Kill Another Animal
tutorial A Tiger Does Not Feel Guilt To Kill Another Animal
A Tiger Does Not Feel Guilt To Kill Another Animal free
#Corona #Predator #Prey

Source: https://ezinearticles.com/?Corona—The-Predator-and-The-Prey&id=10324552