A Hole In The Ground Likely Belongs To What Animal Taking Responsibility for Waste!

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Taking Responsibility for Waste!

Although not the most pleasant subject, septic or sewage systems are absolutely crucial to a healthy, happy and sanitary life. There have been many, many scientific and technological developments in the last century or so, the most important of which is how we dispose of our waste. We’ve probably heard about the tragic methods that many countries around the world have used in previous centuries, but this gives us something to be thankful for if nothing else!

Indeed, many epidemics and plagues throughout the 1800s and before that too, were due to inefficient or sometimes simply revolting sewage systems. Diseases such as cholera, typhoid, yellow fever and even malaria are just a few examples of what can happen when waste is not disposed of properly. Mosquitoes are not only responsible for many of these diseases, but interestingly, they thrive in sewage-contaminated water bodies as opposed to cleaner sources.

Research has proven that mosquitoes raised in polluted water grow larger, fly faster and have an overall lower mortality rate than their inferior counterparts raised in cleaner water. “Nutrient-enriched” water containing large amounts of phosphates of ammonia and other minerals abundant in sewage serves to feed the bacteria and microorganisms that eat the mosquito larvae, fortifying their diet, making them healthier and more sustainable. Another great reason to add to the million to keep your trash where it belongs.

The search for ideal methods of waste disposal is something that man has faced since the beginning of time. We’ve certainly come a long way since our ancestors dug pits as a solution, but there’s still a lot we can learn from the way things used to be. Hey, when it comes down to it, a hole in the ground is still the first thing most of us would think of if there wasn’t a toilet available! Ok, let’s talk about the options, assuming modern city tubes aren’t one of them:

– A hole in the ground outside your kitchen window.

– A hole in the ground about 30 meters in the woods behind your cabin.

– A pipe that leads from your house toilet straight to your front street. (People of history!)

– A septic system.

Given the above choices, a septic system is probably the system of choice if city sewers were not available. – Provided you have some kind of environmental conscience that wouldn’t allow you to dump your sewage into the nearest river. A septic system consists of several key components that together break down wastewater for safe disposal back into groundwater. Designing and maintaining a proper septic system is essential not only for our health, but also for our environment.

The system starts with pipes leading from your toilet to an underground septic tank. This tank is the first stage of decomposition where the heavier solids settle to the bottom and the lighter “sludge” floats to the top. Tanks often have 2 compartments with a partition wall between them. The liquid component of the waste will then flow into the second chamber where further settling will take place. This process is then followed by what is called a drainage field.

A leach field is a piece of land used to filter runoff as it passes through soil layers and eventually into groundwater. A potential drainage field must meet certain “infiltration requirements” before it is considered suitable. If the soil is too porous – too much sand and gravel – it will not effectively “hold” and inactivate harmful pathogens, and conversely, if the soil is not porous enough – such as too much clay – it will not allow water to penetrate. black to the required degree.

The tests that are done on the ground for this purpose are called “penetration tests”. The size of a given leach field is proportional to the amount of incoming wastewater and inversely proportional to the porosity of its soil. Imagine a drainage field as a system of perforated pipes spread over a large area of ​​land. These pipes are usually buried under a layer of soil and gravel to prevent animals from entering. In a well-designed drainage field, gravity will more or less evenly distribute the flow load through its pipes.

Back in the septic tank, the heavier solids are being decomposed through anaerobic digestion. What the hell is this? Well, it’s kind of what makes this whole system even remotely effective. An anaerobic environment is what naturally occurs inside a septic tank when waste is introduced. It’s the bacteria that immediately start eating almost anything that enters the tank.

However, one thing to keep in mind is that a septic system cannot run on autopilot forever. It must be maintained regularly to keep it running efficiently. There are some “irreducible” solids that will remain in the tank and will gradually build up, causing an overflow in the drainage field. An overflow of these solids will clog your drain field and cost right back repair.

Other precautions regarding septic systems include what you can safely flush down the toilet or down the drains – if other sinks are connected, etc.

– Non-biodegradable substances such as cigarette butts, hygiene products, non-biodegradable toilet paper, etc., cannot be decomposed bacterially and will only accumulate, leading to blockage, overflow and premature failure of the septic system.

– Oils and fats are more difficult to break down and can cause clogging and foul odors if large amounts are disposed of.

– Disinfectants, bleaches and chemicals of any kind have the potential to destroy the anaerobic environment. Don’t throw these in your tank!

As a rule, throw away only what is absolutely necessary and nothing more. Maintain septic system for waste water and use other methods like composting etc for other organic waste instead of using landfills. Perform periodic maintenance on your septic system and empty your tank regularly – the intervals depend on the size of your tank, the number of users and your fidelity – or lack thereof – in following the instructions. This is absolutely essential and cannot be ignored.

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