2 Key Variables Used To Classify Viruses That Affect Animals Diabetes 101 – How to Win at Life and Life Insurance

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Diabetes 101 – How to Win at Life and Life Insurance

A recent article from the Hilton Head Health Institute said, “Evidence is mounting that diabetes — especially ‘late-onset’ type 2 diabetes — is becoming an epidemic. Americans’ well-known association with the ‘couch potato’ lifestyle – fatty, high-calorie foods and aversion to exercise – may be a contributing factor in the spread of the disease. On the other side of the coin, a healthy lifestyle is believed to contribute to the prevention and management of diabetes.” A January 9, 2006 New York Times article stated, “that the Centers for Disease Control estimates that 21 million Americans are currently diabetic, while another 41 million suffer from prediabetic symptoms and many are still unaware of it. Over the past decade , the rate of diabetes has increased by 80% in the US. However, most health officials still emphasize the threat of communicable diseases, which are far less deadly than chronic conditions like diabetes.”

Any life insurance agent who has been around long will attest to the statements made in that article. Diabetics now make up a large percentage of our customer base, and the number of people diagnosed as diabetic or pre-diabetic or borderline diabetic in life insurance exams has skyrocketed. While most diabetics are insurable at fair rates, it is alarming to see how many diabetics have actually remained somewhat uneducated about their condition and do not fully understand or care about the fact that diabetes can have a compounding effect on other health and in the end be at least the main cause of a decline in health leading to an early death. Those diabetics who take the situation seriously, by educating themselves, monitoring their diabetes and taking control of other risk factors such as hypertension and obesity, can ultimately lead a long and healthy life. Not surprisingly, this group is also rewarded with life insurance premiums that reflect their concern for their longevity. It should be no secret that life insurance companies reward those who have an interest in their own mortality.

Those who don’t take care of themselves are usually still insurable, but will pay a premium that reflects the end of the risk pool they’ve chosen to swim in. Not understanding the disease, not monitoring your glucose regularly, not changing your lifestyle, and not following your doctor’s suggestions will all contribute to higher rates that you really have to pay if your concern factor was a little higher. Good quiz for a diabetic: Do you know what your hbA1C or A1C level is? Do you know what it refers to? The A1C, a test done by your doctor every time you have a checkup, is a measure of how well you’re controlling your diabetes. Glucose in the blood binds to hemoglobin through a process called glycosylation. The higher the blood sugar, the more glucose binds to hemoglobin. A blood test can measure the amount of glycosylation that has occurred by detecting average blood glucose levels for the previous three to four months before the test.

Do you understand why this is important to you? With a healthy A1C level, say, 6.5 or less, you know your glucose is staying under control for long periods. Don’t fool yourself into believing that the glucose reading you took before breakfast this morning is indicative of where your glucose is all the time. For example, let’s say you take your glucose at an optimal time, before breakfast, and the reading is 110. Then let’s assume your A1C is 7.5. This would show that your average glucose over the past 3 months is around 165. So if the average is 165 and the low is 110, that means there are many times when your glucose is over 200, not a healthy level . What are the complications of type 2 diabetes? What really worries life insurers? This list came from the American Diabetes Association website. www.diabetes.org:

Heart disease and stroke

People with diabetes have additional reasons to be aware of heart and blood vessel disease. Diabetes carries an increased risk for heart attack, stroke, and complications related to poor circulation.

Kidney disease

Diabetes can damage the kidneys, which can not only cause them to fail, but also cause them to lose their ability to filter waste products.

Eye complications

Diabetes can cause eye problems and can lead to blindness. People with diabetes have a higher risk of blindness than people without diabetes. Early detection and treatment of eye problems can save your sight.

Diabetic neuropathy and nerve damage

One of the most common complications of diabetes is diabetic neuropathy. Neuropathy means damage to the nerves that run throughout the body, connecting the spinal cord to muscles, skin, blood vessels and other organs.

Foot complications

People with diabetes can develop many different foot problems. Foot problems occur more often when there is nerve damage in the feet or when blood circulation is poor. Learn how to protect your feet by following some basic guidelines.

Skin complications

About a third of people with diabetes will have a skin disorder caused or affected by diabetes at some point in their lives. In fact, such problems are sometimes the first sign that a person has diabetes. Fortunately, most skin conditions can be easily prevented or treated if detected early.

Gastroparesis and diabetes

Gastroparesis is a disorder that affects people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

DEPRESSION

It’s normal to feel it now and then. But some people feel a sadness that just won’t go away. Life seems hopeless. Feeling this way most of the day for two weeks or more is a sign of serious depression.

After all, there is good news for type 2 diabetics working to get life insurance. With improvements in treatment and all the diabetes education available, you can control your condition and, to a large extent, control your ability to obtain affordable life insurance. Type 1 Diabetes Type 1 diabetes, often called juvenile diabetes, is different from type 2 diabetes, but often has many of the same complications. While type 2 diabetes occurs when a person has too little natural insulin or his or her body is unable to use insulin effectively, type 1 diabetes is a lack of insulin altogether. From www.ehealthmd.com we get this opinion about the cause of type 1 diabetes. “Diabetes is an autoimmune disease. This means that the body’s defense system attacks some of the body’s cells. In type 1 diabetes, the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin are destroyed and therefore they are no longer able to produce insulin.

We don’t know exactly why this happens, but we do know that some people are born with a tendency to develop diabetes. Then something “triggers” the onset of the disease. It could be a virus that causes it to start, or it could be something in the environment. There is nothing a person can do to prevent this from happening.”

As stated, a person with type 1 diabetes has two options. They can control their diabetes by constantly monitoring their glucose levels and being very dedicated and dogmatic about administering insulin as prescribed. There is an often misunderstood relationship between diet and diabetes. The Mayo Clinic website at www.mayoclinic.com suggests the following: “Contrary to popular perception, there is no diabetic diet. Furthermore, having diabetes does not mean that you should only eat bland, boring foods . Rather, it means you’ll eat more fruits, vegetables, and whole grains — nutrient-dense foods that are low in fat and calories — and less animal products and sweets. In fact, it’s the same meal plan that everyone should follow.” So a healthy diet and ongoing monitoring and treatment are key.

The other option I suggested would be the option of not taking your diabetes seriously. A type 1 diabetic who only occasionally checks their glucose is not terribly committed to a healthy lifestyle and may not take insulin as prescribed, but more when they feel they need it, is a person seeking a long-term health problem. . The long-term effects of mismanaged type 1 diabetes are at best detrimental and at worst deadly. It should come as no surprise that life insurance underwriters pay particular attention to the type of compliance you maintain with your doctor and dietitian and the type of control you achieve and maintain with your glucose levels. or for that matter, a life insurance agent who is knowledgeable about diabetes telling him that your most recent glucose reading was 98. That could be control, but it could also be a timely glucose check. . The real story comes from your regular lab work and the test that reveals all the secrets, hbA1C. This test will consider both 98 and 230; the reading you didn’t want to discuss or maybe you didn’t get because you knew it was a bad time for a good reading.

Your doctor and life insurance underwriter are preaching from the same book, and the preaching is CONTROL! CONTROL! CONTROL! The Mayo Clinic summarizes the consequences of not following this advice. “Long-term complications include – Heart and blood vessel disease (cardiovascular) – Nerve damage (neuropathy) – Kidney damage (nephropathy) – Eye damage (diabetic retinopathy) – Osteoporosis and some skin diseases.” Short-term complications such as low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), high blood sugar (hyperglycemia), and high levels of ketones in the urine (diabetic ketoacidosis) require immediate care. If left untreated, these conditions can cause seizures and loss of consciousness. (coma).” you will pay for life insurance. Diabetes does not preclude getting life insurance at competitive and good rates. Poorly controlled diabetes can, for quite obvious reasons, make life insurance expensive and even unaffordable.

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