14 What Basic Functions Must Animals Do To Stay Alive Global Warming – Drought & Chinese Imports Shape an "Experiment in Agriculture" for Colorado

You are searching about 14 What Basic Functions Must Animals Do To Stay Alive, today we will share with you article about 14 What Basic Functions Must Animals Do To Stay Alive was compiled and edited by our team from many sources on the internet. Hope this article on the topic 14 What Basic Functions Must Animals Do To Stay Alive is useful to you.

Global Warming – Drought & Chinese Imports Shape an "Experiment in Agriculture" for Colorado

“…THOSE WHO WORK ON THE LAND ARE GOD’S CHOSEN PEOPLE, IF HE HAS HAD A CHOSEN PEOPLE, IN WHOSE BOYS HE HAS MADE SPECIAL DEPOSITS FOR HEALTHY AND TRUE VIRTUES. THE FIRE WHICH OTHERWISE CANNOT GO OUT OF THE EARTH”. Thomas Jefferson, 1789

Ethno-Agriculture

According to the book “History of Colorado Agriculture,” the primitive plows used to break the soil in Colorado’s first farming settlements (San Luis Valley) were made of piñon wood for its superior strength. The piñon was life to our farming communities, and more than a few early exploration parties in the Rockies, both Spanish and American, were saved from starvation by the piñon and its nuts. The Piñon Pine, the Piñon Nut, and the settlement of people in Colorado have a history that begins in the Basketmaker Culture according to the Pecos Classification System. Piñon ecosystems have had existential, cultural, spiritual, economic, aesthetic, and medicinal value to Native American peoples for centuries and continue to be widely studied in its past and present area(s). Among ethno-botanists and archaeologists, a consensus is that the first human settlements in Colorado resulted from Piñon Nuts providing a source of winter protein—sustaining life when game was scarce—allowing man to build the first societies (Dwellings of rocks) in Colorado.

Eastern Agriculture beats Western Agriculture

Currently, over 80% of the $49 million worth of pine nuts consumed in the US market are IMPORTED FROM China, with no benefit to Western owners. “We have thousands of American families buying and eating pine nuts – unaware of their true Chinese origin.” Piñon Nuts provide an important source of protein – at levels that exceed even walnuts and walnuts – with significant amounts of vitamin A, riboflavin, thiamin and niacin – “they really have no nutritional rival in the world of nuts”. Also, Piñon trees naturally function as a “huge carbon sink” for the planet by removing carbon. “Certainly, as consumers discover that they are unknowingly getting more of their protein from eating ‘cloned beef protein,’ the thought of adding a wild, natural protein to their diet—like what found in Piñon Nut’s – it’s attractive for health and the environment.”.

This project involves ‘experimental dryland farming’ in establishing a pine tree improvement program. Nut pine improvement programs can involve four main steps: 1) Selection of superior trees–(eg, “plus-trees”)–from natural centers; 2) Grafting these superior plus trees in orchards to produce genetically improved seeds (nuts); 3) Field testing these plus trees to identify the best trees and improve orchard seed (cone and nut size) by removing inferior trees; and 4) Continuous improvement and development of even better varieties through interbreeding of the best trees. It is known that the size of the pine nut crop is strongly influenced by the environment and that pests and health are important. For example, aphid moth activity decreases piñon cone production, as do dry weather and high temperatures, regardless of the tree’s genetics. And tree size, an important determinant of cone culture potential, is greatly influenced by soil type, climate, pest history, competition, etc. There are so many factors that affect the ‘phenotype’ — what you see — that the only way to determine the characteristics of a tree’s ‘genotype’ is to grow progeny from its seeds in progeny testing.

Dryland agriculture as it relates to the Piñon pine

“As a field of research and development, dryland agriculture or desert agriculture involves the study of how to increase the agricultural productivity of lands dominated by a lack of fresh water, an abundance of heat and sunlight, and usually one or more winters extreme. cold, short rainy season, salty soil or water, strong dry winds, poor soil structure, overgrazing, limited technological development, poverty…” Wikipedia…

There are two basic approaches to solutions

oi sees given environmental and socio-economic characteristics as negative obstacles to be overcome

o See as many of them as positive resources to use

Vision of the Future – Colorado Piñon Nut Orchards?

Looking to the future, it is possible to see an increasing number of farmers and landowners throughout the Southwest appreciating the benefits of now managing their dry unprofitable Piñon Forests as Piñon Nut Orchards. Developed breeding, pollination and tree cultivation practices – already in use to improve crop yields in Pecan, Walnut and Apple orchards can be applied for economic benefit in the Piñon Nut Orchard. “A farmer can either create an orchard with planting or planting seeds, or increase the productivity of native Piñon trees already on the ground,” said Alan Peterson, who pioneered the research. And with Piñon nuts selling for over $15 a pound – this truly represents a new: “Environmental Business Model.”

“THE CULTIVATORS OF THE SOIL ARE THE MOST VALUABLE CITIZENS, THEY ARE THE MOST FRUITFUL, THE MOST INDEPENDENT, THE MOST VIRTUE, AND ARE ATTACHED TO THEIR COUNTRY, AND FREELY MARRIED TO ITS PEOPLE. FIND EMPLOYMENT IN THIS LINE, I WILL NOT CONVERT HIM INTO A MARINE, ARTISAN, OR ANYTHING ELSE…” Thomas Jefferson, 1785

Entrance to Piñon

Of the approximately (14) nut species cultivated in the United States, the piñon remains to be cultivated.

The ancestor of the piñon pine was a member of the Madro-Tertiary Flora, (a group of drought-resistant species), which starting 60 million years ago, its host climate began to change from wet to dry.

Piñon (Pinus Edulis) is a slow-growing, small, drought-tolerant, and fairly long-lived native species of the Southwestern United States. Its common name is derived from the Spanish piñon and refers to the large seed of the pino (pine). Other common names are Colorado piñon, and pine nut. Existing forests, where piñon is the main species, cover about 36 million hectares combined in Colorado, New Mexico, Utah and Arizona, but drought and attacks by pine beetles and various pathogens have had a significant effect on piñon populations.

Piñon trees thrive in areas with annual rainfall from a minimum of 10″ per year, up to 22″ inches and where temperatures exist from an extreme low of -35 Celsius, all within 90 frost-free days per year. At its highest elevation range and northernmost latitude, native Piñon growth can be found in a variety of soil depths, textures, from rocky gravels, to fine, compacted clays, and at elevations from 4,500 to 7,500 feet, with isolated specimens up to 9,400 feet.

From research into the most desirable Piñon Orchard locations (eg low land values, good elevation + rainfall, high existing production, native Piñon stands), it stands out that those rural communities most in need for any economic stimulation were found close to these parameters. . Thus, the Piñon Orchards would be of considerable value from their establishment and harvesting of the nuts, especially in those areas currently considered unsuitable for traditional agricultural crops. It is hopeful that a small rural community will ‘brand’ itself around a growing collection and consumption of Piñon Nuts ie… by hosting a ‘Piñon Nut Festival’ theme, piñon nut merchandise (candy, menu items and their creation as a result of Improved Piñon Orchards Thus the co-location of active Piñon cultivation in the vicinity of rural areas that need some economic stimulation may turn out to be one of the most exciting benefits.

Economic benefits of increased Piñon nut production

Beneficial impacts on a local economy develop through several different channels: the sale of the nut crop would directly affect the economy, through purchases of goods and services locally, and indirectly, as these purchases generate purchases of intermediate goods and services from others. related sectors of the economy. Also, these direct and indirect effects increase employment and income, increasing the purchasing power of the economy as a whole, thereby encouraging further spending on goods and services. This cycle continues until spending eventually flows out of the local economy as a result of taxes, savings, or purchases of non-locally produced goods and services.

Barriers to the commercial cultivation of Piñon

o The complexities of water use, water rights, and water availability in Colorado, and all the arid lands of the West.

o Piñon nut (seed) production is cyclical and good harvests can occur at 2-7 year intervals, but the average crop was produced at 4.1 year intervals from a 58 year study.

o Slow growth rates in typical specimens unless placed under intensive cultivation or grafting practices.

o Limited existing knowledge on cross-pollination and nut size and nut yield improvement from cultivated or native piñon plantations in the United States.

o Existing knowledge or limited research on grafting success in piñon or other nut pine species.

o Perhaps the most drought-tolerant characteristics of any nut-producing plant – increasingly important in a ‘global warming’ climate ‘start’.

o Highest protein per weight than all nuts except cashews.

o Piñon has adaptability to the widest range of soil types.

o Piñon suffers little damage from ‘browsing’ deer, elk, rabbits and rodents throughout its range.

o Higher and better use of drylands than raising beef cattle with a protein yield per hectare. (Piñon nuts = 123% more efficient protein per acre than beef.)

o Few concerns about disease and herbivorous insects.

Scotch pines have historically received little scientific focus as crop producers. In (1917) Dr. Robert T. Norris (NNGA) recognized the potential (and future) of pine nuts: “I suppose that the widespread planting of pines for food purposes will have to wait until we have advanced to the point of establishing other types of nuts (nuts, walnuts, etc.) on good soil first. Pines will be used for the barren hills when the people of … hundreds of years begin to complain of the high cost of living.”

…”No sentiment is more accepted in the farming family than that the few who can afford it should bear the risk and expense of all improvements, and freely give the benefits to many of the most limited circumstances.” Thomas Jefferson, 1810

Video about 14 What Basic Functions Must Animals Do To Stay Alive

You can see more content about 14 What Basic Functions Must Animals Do To Stay Alive on our youtube channel: Click Here

Question about 14 What Basic Functions Must Animals Do To Stay Alive

If you have any questions about 14 What Basic Functions Must Animals Do To Stay Alive, please let us know, all your questions or suggestions will help us improve in the following articles!

The article 14 What Basic Functions Must Animals Do To Stay Alive was compiled by me and my team from many sources. If you find the article 14 What Basic Functions Must Animals Do To Stay Alive helpful to you, please support the team Like or Share!

Rate Articles 14 What Basic Functions Must Animals Do To Stay Alive

Rate: 4-5 stars
Ratings: 1667
Views: 76594174

Search keywords 14 What Basic Functions Must Animals Do To Stay Alive

14 What Basic Functions Must Animals Do To Stay Alive
way 14 What Basic Functions Must Animals Do To Stay Alive
tutorial 14 What Basic Functions Must Animals Do To Stay Alive
14 What Basic Functions Must Animals Do To Stay Alive free
#Global #Warming #Drought #amp #Chinese #Imports #Shape #quotExperiment #Agriculturequot #Colorado

Source: https://ezinearticles.com/?Global-Warming—Drought-and-Chinese-Imports-Shape-an-Experiment-in-Agriculture-for-Colorado&id=674004